1. Rudy Nimocks was a member of the Chicago police force for 33 years, and the University of Chicago Police Chief for 20 years. For someone who has done all of this, as well as being in the military, Nimocks is still incredibly active and energetic. It was great for us that he was so enthusiastic in telling us about his experiences in Chicago. His neighborhood, Woodlawn, served as an intriguing site of study for various phenomena in Chicago education and policing philosophies. Both areas of study have evolved a lot in Chicago in terms of racism. Nimocks spoke of how Caucasian and African-American cops used to never be assigned to work together, and did not ride in the same cop cars together, which perpetuated the racial divides throughout Chicago. As someone who was a cop in the Chicago policing system, Nimocks now tries to prevent people from being put in jail. He explained this growth by connecting the need for police reform to the need for education reform. Both situations require more focus on the improvement of the surroundings of individuals as they grow into their place in society. I especially loved Ruddy’s talk on education policy; he really elaborated on how education affects each individual child, children’s families, and the larger communities in Chicago and other urban areas. Like Toni Preckwinkle, Nimocks sees the important correlation between the failed students and jailed citizens, and is working to help his community escape this vicious cycle.

    Rudy Nimocks was a member of the Chicago police force for 33 years, and the University of Chicago Police Chief for 20 years. For someone who has done all of this, as well as being in the military, Nimocks is still incredibly active and energetic. It was great for us that he was so enthusiastic in telling us about his experiences in Chicago. His neighborhood, Woodlawn, served as an intriguing site of study for various phenomena in Chicago education and policing philosophies. Both areas of study have evolved a lot in Chicago in terms of racism. Nimocks spoke of how Caucasian and African-American cops used to never be assigned to work together, and did not ride in the same cop cars together, which perpetuated the racial divides throughout Chicago. As someone who was a cop in the Chicago policing system, Nimocks now tries to prevent people from being put in jail. He explained this growth by connecting the need for police reform to the need for education reform. Both situations require more focus on the improvement of the surroundings of individuals as they grow into their place in society. I especially loved Ruddy’s talk on education policy; he really elaborated on how education affects each individual child, children’s families, and the larger communities in Chicago and other urban areas. Like Toni Preckwinkle, Nimocks sees the important correlation between the failed students and jailed citizens, and is working to help his community escape this vicious cycle.

Notes

  1. kiarademocracy posted this